Marty Rosendahl /Hanson-Brooks

Marty Rosendahl /Hanson-Brooks

Marty Rosendahl /Hanson-Brooks

marty rosendahlDetroit, MI

Marty has been running with Hanson's for over 3 years and has had his share of ups and downs. Marty recently reached one of his greatest running successes at the Boston Marathon. He ran 2:21:12 and placed 22nd overall but more importantly qualified for the Olympic Trials marathon. Read on to find out what Marty has gone through in the past couple years and to hear his thoughts on Boston.

RM: You had a very good 10 miler(47:59) just over 2 years ago at Papa Johns as well as a sub 2:20 marathon within that same year. Why were you sort of off the radar the past two years and what has gotten you back on the right track?

MR:
That 10 miler in 2003 was short of 10 miles, and they have since lengthened the course. That doesn't discount the fact that I beat some really good runners that day, and to this day it's still probably the best race I've ever run. Then I went through a rough spot for the track season in 2004 and thought I had it turned around in the fall for the Twin Cities Marathon, and thought I was going to run another great race, but I caught a cold 10 days out, my body got sore, and it never really got un-sore, and I went into the race with a bit lower confidence than I should have. Still, I was too aggressive in the early going of that race, and tried racing people in the first 10 miles. Then when it came time to really race, my tank was empty, so by the time the day was done at Twin Cities, I felt like I had performed well below my potential. So I didn't feel that the 2:19:35 was really representative of my fitness at all. I came back and had a lackluster race at the US XC Nationals in Portland (got sick again 2 days before we left - not a good routine.) After all that, my confidence had taken quite a hit. Then I started getting injured. I got a tweaked knee and had to skip the winter XC Nationals in Feb '05, and then while I was training for the 2005 Papa John's 10 miler I wound up with a stress fracture in my femur 2 weeks before that race. I didn't know it was a stress fracture until the day before that race when I was describing the pain to Clint and he kept cringing and told me at the end of it all that he was sure I had a stress fracture. That was probably the single biggest hit to my confidence and fitness, but wound up being about the best thing that could have happened to me mentally. I wound up having something like 15 weeks between that race and the next time I was able to do a hard workout. I really missed being out there running with the team, and it helped me to realize that even when I wasn't on top of my game out running, it's still the one thing that I really want to do and don't know what I would do if I could never do it again. In other words, when it sucks, I still love it, but I had to suffer from missing it to realize it. So it renewed my focus. Since then I've still had injury problems, and all my injuries have been in the leg that I broke, so I just figure that some of those muscles/tendons/ligaments got weak when I was babying my leg because the break was so painful, and then I just kept getting too aggressive when I was trying to regain fitness. Now having run Boston, I'm more excited about racing as I ever have been. The atmosphere out there was so unbelievable that I've only been on down-time for 4 days, and I'm itching to get out and run again, and I can't wait to run my next marathon. So to sum it all up, I think the two biggest factors that have gotten me back on track was 1) getting refocused on just running while I was injured with that stress-fracture, and now 2) getting refocused on competing because of the euphoria of running Boston. I really feel like I've got my ducks in a row right now, and I'm more focused and intent on training and competing as I've ever been. RM: How did you feel about your Boston Marathon performance?

MR:
I'm very happy with my Boston performance, and at the same time very disappointed. I had gotten injured in February and wound up losing a lot of extremely important training time. I had been running close to 120 miles/week leading up to the 12 week Boston Buildup, and I was feeling like I was really starting to come around and then picked up that injury 11 weeks out. I wasn't able to get fully back into training until about 6 or 7 weeks before the race. For the little time I had to train, I feel that I ran as well as I possibly could have on that day, and that I stuck in there and gave it my best shot regardless of my fitness level. So I'm happy with my effort, because I believe it was a good representation of my fitness at the time. I'm also happy that I have a little more marathon experience now, and that can only help in future marathons. I'm just disappointed I suffered from the injury that kept me from achieving my full potential for that one. I was probably 70% of what I would have been if I hadn't suffered that injury 11 or 12 weeks before the race.

RM: How is your body feeling after taking on the Boston Marathon?

MR:
I'm feeling surprisingly good after Boston. My quads are recovering quickly, I don't feel like there are any tweaks that need special attention, so I'm just focusing on dong some stretching and massage through the recovery. The first couple days afterwards were pretty rough, but the euphoria of the event helps mask that, and now I'm starting to feel really good. RM: What races will we see you line up for next?

MR:
There's a few races on my radar right now that I might like to do. The 10k at Hillsdale in June is an option as is the Steamboat 4 miler. Bix might also be a good race to go and run. A little longer term, I'm excited to get back to the marathon, and now that I've run two marathons on tough courses, I'd like to get to a course and gun for a fast time, so I'm really leaning towards Chicago at this point. There's a lot more options, but those are the ones that I'm mainly interested in, and I'll have to sit down with Kevin and Keith after I get back running and see what really makes sense. RM: From what I have heard, you haven't been working in the running stores. What are you doing to make ends meet while still training at a high level?

MR:
It's true that I no longer work in the running stores. To make ends meet, I've been doing about anything (legal) for money that I can. I made a few bucks last summer and fall racing, and when training isn't super intense (like during this downtime) I do some landscaping with a friend of mine from Saginaw. My core support though is that my wife works 2 part-time jobs, and I work at Panera Bread 2 blocks from where I live. It's been a sweet setup for me.

Thanks for the great interview Marty! (Interview conducted by Nick Cordes)

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